..
..
..

Re: Christianity and copyright law


Home Forums Spiritual Discussions Christianity and copyright law Re: Christianity and copyright law

#29389
Avatar of DBNickel
DBNickel
Member

@Digital Aura wrote:

Bulk licenses are for churches to print and distribute chord charts and lyrics, or to show them on slides, etc.
I don’t necessarily believe that DJ’s pay for similar licenses to play whatever they want… at least, I don’t know any DJs that pay for it.

There is a similar license for churches to play recorded music – which falls under a different license (because often one person owns the composition, another can own the arrangement, and usually someone else owns the recording)

You’re right – DJ’s aren’t liable – the venue is.

@Digital Aura wrote:

My point being, license or no, there is no exception to the law insofar as allowing the mixset for download…. you simply are not allowed to do that, and as Dunamis admits… everyone does it regardless.

You may be 100% there. I believe if the record company doesn’t want you to include their music they have to send a cease and desist… but the way they are going now, I would be surprised if they don’t sue you for mentioning their artist by name.

Lawsuit claiming purshased ringtones should be considered a public performance and therefore require additional licenses:
http://www.eff.org/files/(Redacted)%20ASCAP's%20Opposition%20to%20AT&T's%20MSJ%20Ringtones.pdf

ASCAP Stops the Girl Scouts from Singing around the Campfire:
http://www.brandnamebullies.com/excerpts.html

BTW – that last article makes me sad : – (

@Digital Aura wrote:

A parody is usually a comical device by which the artist/actor pokes fun of something by imitating something. It’s only parody when you ridicule something. You can parody something without even using the actual trademark or copyrighted material.

Parody doesn’t HAVE to be funny, or even specifically ridiculing something.

@DBNickel wrote:

From Dictionary.com – Parody: Music The practice of reworking an already established composition, especially the incorporation into the Mass of material borrowed from other works, such as motets or madrigals.

Again, at this point I’m discussing legal issues – not moral ones. ;)
(not a lawyer)